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Above knee amputation survival rates

Overall, the 5-year mortality rate was very high among patients with any amputation (major and minor combined), ranging from 53% to 100%, and in patients with major amputations, ranging from 52% to 80%. Mortality after below-the-knee amputation ranged from 40% to 82% and after above-the-knee amputation from 40% to 90% We performed a retrospective review of a vascular surgery quality assurance database to evaluate the perioperative and long-term morbidity and mortality of above-knee amputations (AKA, n = 234) and below-knee amputations (BKA, n = 720) and to examine the effect of diabetes mellitus (DM) (181 of AKA and 606 of BKA patients)

Sometimes, with infection, you may live up to 2-3 months, but after the leg amputation, your life may be shortened up to one month or lengthened up to a year or more. Luck always plays a critical role here, even if you don't believe it or not In a series of 1498 peripheral vascular bypass patients, Landry et al. (18) reported survival rates of 72.4% at 5 years, 67.8% at 7 years, and 53.4% at 10 years. These figures compare favorably to the survival rates of amputees This study adds prognostic information for a well-defined population of people with a first amputation at or proximal to a transtibial level, due to a vascular or infection related cause. Mortality rates were 22% at 30 days, 44% at 1 year and 77% at 5 years. Median survival was 20.3 months

Patients Nine hundred fifty-nine consecutive major lower extremity amputations in 788 patients, including 704 below-knee amputations (BKAs) (73.4%) and 255 above-knee amputations (AKAs) (26.6%). Main Outcome Measures Patient survival, cardiac morbidity, infectious complications, and subsequent operation The 6-month mortality of above knee amputations was 50%. There is an interesting paradox in amputation patients. Rarely will a surgeon explain the mortality rates of above knee amputation to the patient or family. These patients do not undergo cardiovascular evaluation for pre-op clearance prior to amputation The weighted mean of re-amputation was 20.14%, 29.63% and 45.72% at 1, 3 and 5 years respectively. The weighted mean of mortality at 1, 3 and 5 years were 13.62%, 30.25% and 50.55% respectively with significantly higher rates associated with major amputation, re-amputation and ischemic cardiomyopathy In a study by Fletcher, et al, the median survival was 1.5 years after an amputation, which is significantly less than the expected survival rate of 7.5 years for age-matched controls. There is a significant increase in 30 day mortality rate related to age and number of co-morbiditis Siera et al. reported an above knee amputation rate of 0.36% among 18,443 total knee replacements from the Mayo Clinic, with the observation that quite a few of these came from bilateral knee replacement cases. There is a possible benefit in research where identical treatment is administered bilaterally and simultaneously by one surgeon

Amputation rates (incident cases) were calculated in patients with and without DM. The primary endpoint was all-cause survival after first amputation during dialysis therapy in diabetic patients compared with non-diabetic dialysis patients with an amputation. This was formally assessed using interaction analysis (Poisson regression) Survival rates were 90% in the first 7 days, 84% in the first 30 days, and 64% after the first year. Patient median life expectancy post-surgery was 930 ± 106 days Lower-limb amputation is a surgical procedure performed to remove a limb that has been damaged due to trauma, disease, or congenital defect. Transfemoral (above-knee) amputation comprises approximately 27% of all lower-limb amputations. Amputation is possible in any age group, but its prevalence is highest among people aged 65 years and older An above-the-knee amputation is surgery to remove your leg above the knee. Your doctor removed the leg while keeping as much healthy bone, skin, blood vessel, and nerve tissue as possible. After the surgery, you will probably have bandages, a rigid dressing, or a cast over the remaining part of your leg (residual limb). The leg may be swollen.

We know that about 50% of all diabetics with an amputation are dead 3 years after the amputation. 65% of all of those with a diabetic amputation are dead 5 years. In spite of this, there is hope... most are preventable Acute admission independently conferred a 44% increased risk of mortality after a major amputation (HR 1.44 [95% CI 1.07-1.93]) and a 43% increased risk of mortality after a minor amputation (1.43 [95% CI 0.92-2.22])

Mortality After Nontraumatic Major Amputation Among

Perioperative and long-term morbidity and mortality after

Life Expectancy after Leg Amputation 2021 Types

Traumatic amputations occur in only 1% of all trauma patients, but they are associated with significant morbidities and a mortality rate of almost 15%. 4,5 The majority of civilian-related traumatic amputations are accidental and associated with motor vehicle collisions (MVCs), machinery, and gun violence Background: To assess the 5-year and 10-year survival rates of major (above ankle disarticulation level) dysvascular lower limb amputees attending a sub-regional Disablement Services Centre (DSC) specialising in amputee rehabilitation. Also t The risk factors associated with reduced survival rates after lower extremity amputations were: above-knee amputations, postoperative cardiac complications, higher age, renal failure, male gender, Hispanics, and associated peripheral vascular disease [10, 13, 14]. Although diabetic foot disease and DFU-related lower extremity amputations are.

Subramaniam, B, Pomposelli, F, Talmor, D. Perioperative and long term morbidity and mortality after above knee and below knee amputations in diabetics and non-diabetics. Anesth Analg 2005; 100: New ulceration, new major amputation and survival rates in diabetic subjects An overall survival rate for all 93 modular arthrodeses was after one year 86%, after five years 71% and after ten years 61% (Table 1). Table 2 Modular knee-arthrodesis (MKA) versus Above-the-knee amputation (AKA) after prosthetic joint infection (PJI): clinical course, complications, functional outcome and quality of lif Actuarial survival in below-knee amputation (BKA) patients vs above-knee amputation (AKA) patients ( P .001). (REPRINTED) ARCH SURG/VOL 139, APR 2004 WWW.ARCHSURG.CO Some studies have observed significant differences in mortality between patients undergoing minor or major amputations, with major amputations associated with reduced long-term survival.24-26 A recent systematic review reported an overall 5-year mortality rate ranging from 29% to 69% following minor amputations and from 52% to 80% for.

Amputation level below ankle was considered as minor and above ankle as major amputations. The authors concluded that five-year and ten-year survival rates were 40 percent and 24 percent, respectively, following diabetic foot amputations. Patients older than age 70 years had a lower survival rate compared with younger age groups after lower. rehabilitation. In modern practice, lower limb amputations are most commonly performed at the Below-Knee (BKA) or Above Knee (AKA) level. Despite well documented functional bene ts over AKA, the lesser known rough-Knee Amputation (TKA) seems to have fallen out of favor with vascular surgeons, comprising less than 2% of major lower limb amputations Bone cancer victim, 21, opts for leg amputation after doctors warn it's her only hope of survival after disease spreads to her lungs. Sophie Walton was diagnosed with bone cancer in 2011 after.

Perioperative and Long-Term Morbidity and Mortality After

An above-the-knee amputation is surgery to remove your leg above the knee. Your doctor removed the leg while keeping as much healthy bone, skin, blood vessel, and nerve tissue as possible. After the surgery, you will probably have bandages, a rigid dressing, or a cast over the remaining part of your leg (residual limb). The leg may be swollen. Mortality after lower limb amputation is high, with UK 30-day mortality rates of 9-17%. We performed a retrospective analysis of factors affecting early and late outcome after lower limb amputation for peripheral vascular disease or diabetic complications at a UK tertiary referral vascular centre between 2003 and 2010 Amputation , Lower limb , Survival , Fatal outcome Having a lower limb amputation is associated with a somehow high risk of not surviving within the first year from surgery, with perioperative mortality ranging from 9 to 16% [ 15 ], and 1-year survival rates ranging from 86 to 53% [ 110 ] Recovering from bilateral above-knee amputation takes a long time. People who have lost both legs are the survivors of a devastating traumatic injury, a life-threatening illness or a congenital limb difference. Some of these circumstances may require a lengthy physical and psychological recovery simply to regain strength and overall health

Lower extremity amputation is performed to remove ischemic, infected, necrotic tissue or locally unresectable tumor and, at times, is a life-saving procedure. Peripheral artery disease, alone or in combination with diabetes mellitus, contributes to more than one-half of all amputations; trauma is the second leading cause Using the same ratio of amputations:casualties for the Confederate as the Union had (about 0.039) that gives an estimate of 22,000 Confederate amputees. I'd suspect the Confederate amputees had a lower survival rate than their Union counterparts. Does anyone have amputation rates for the Napoleonic Wars for comparison I had my above-knee amputation due to osteosarcoma (bone cancer) when I was 23. See My Story as an Amputee. My new prosthetic knee, the Very Good Knee - Short Transfemoral (VGK-S), is specifically designed for above knee amputees having a short stump. Go to Prosthetic Knee for Short Stump

Short and Long Term Mortality Rates after a Lower Limb

Primary survival and prosthetic fitting of lower limb amputees In this study there remains a disappointingly high rate of above-knee amputations in relation to below-knee amputations, although there has been a shift in emphasis towards preservation of the knee joint compared with the clinical series during the period 1950-1963 (Vankka, 1967. Survival rates after a foot, below-knee, or above-knee amputation over 10 years are also listed in Table 1. In the survival analysis, individuals with high-level amputations and individuals with renal disease displayed significantly higher mortality rates than individuals with lower-level amputations and individuals without renal disease.

between 4% to 22%, but more proximal the level of amputation, the greater the risk of unfavorable outcomes [6]. Proximal amputation causes immediate loss of preload, which leads to cardiac overwork. Below the knee amputation has a greater negative effect on the survival rate because the preload loss depends on the volume of tissue loss Rush DS, Huston CC, Bivens BA, Hyde GL (1981). Operative and late mortality rates of above-knee and below-knee amputations. Am Surg 47, 36-39. Stewart CPU, Jain AS, Ogston SA (1992) Lower limb amputee survival. Prosthet Orthot Int 16, 11-1

Prognosis for Osteosarcoma in a Dog. The average life expectancy of dogs with appendicular osteosarcoma that don't receive treatment is 2 to 4 months. A dog that has been amputated and has had chemotherapy can expect to live for 10 to 12 months. If the cancer has metastasized to the chest, the prognosis is much poorer and young dogs with. The healing rates for below- and above-knee amputations vary considerably. It is thought that a total of 90% of above-knee major amputations heal, 70% primarily, whereas for below-knee amputations, primary healing rates range between 30% and 92%, with a re-amputation rate of up to 30% In 2010, 73,000 American adults who have diabetes and are over age 20 had amputations. That may sound like a lot, but amputations account for only a small percentage of the over 29 million people. the above-knee amputee (586 patients). The vascular related amputees had an overall median survival of 4 yr. In the two decades 1970-1979 and 1980-1989 there were significant differences between the survival time of the below-knee and above-knee amputee. The survival of the amputee has increased during the two decades from 3 y

Major Lower Extremity Amputation: Outcome of a Modern

The impact of the operating surgeon's specialty (vascular vs. non-vascular surgeon) on outcomes was evaluated. The study cohort comprised 140 patients who underwent MLEA (110 below-knee amputations [BKA] and 30 above-knee amputations [AKA]; ratio: 3:1; 86 men; 54 women; mean age, 62.9 ± 1.1 years) EWS Multiple Amputations. Case Scenario. ∎A 24 year old male special operations marine was on an advise and assist mission in Jolo, Philippines, when he inadvertently stepped on an IED placed by Abu Sayyaf. His sustained traumatic bilateral above knee amputations, a near amputation of his right hand, and pelvic and abdominal injuries. 1 In order to save her life, she underwent an above knee amputation of her right leg in December of 2014. Despite the setback, Irene was determined that the amputation and cancer were not going to get the best of her. The doctors gave me a 50% chance of survival, but as an amputee I'm proud of the independence that sockets give you. I now. How amputations are done. Amputations can be done under general anaesthetic (where you're unconscious) or using either an epidural anaesthetic or spinal anaesthetic (both of which numb the lower half of the body). The choice of anaesthetic can depend on what part of your body is being amputated. Most amputations involve removing a section of a limb rather than the entire limb

Outcomes of Amputation Vascular Disease Management HMP

Impact of Chronic Kidney Disease on Survival After

Lower extremity amputations and long-term outcomes in

Chief outcome measures: Mortality, amputation, rehabilitation, survival and knee salvage rates. The Kaplan-Meier method was used for comparison of factors associated with knee preservation. Results- Primary amputees had a higher in-hospital mortality (18% vs. 10%) but similar 3 year survival rates (30% In general, a below-knee amputation is preferred over an above-knee amputation (AKA), because below-knee amputation (BKA) has better rehabilitation and functional outcomes 10). The rates of lower extremity amputation have declined in recent years, but still, 3,500 trauma-related amputations are performed in the United States each year 11) Introduction The stump wound complications after above-knee amputation lead to other problems, such as prolonged rehabilitation, delayed prosthetic restoration, the increase in total treatment cost and high mortality rates. Objective To evaluate the safety and outcomes of negative-pressure wound therapy (NPWT) using Vacuum-Assisted Closure (VAC®) therapy in patients with stump complication. 5-24 percent will eventually lead to limb amputation within 6-18 months of the initial evaluation According to the National Diabetes Statistics Report , 108,000 adults had lower extremity.

Older People with Amputations - Physiopedi

1.8 million people in the United States are living with amputations, and between 30,000 and 40,000 amputations are performed in the United States on an annual basis (1). Below knee amputations are the most common amputation surgery and comprise approximately 23% of lower limb amputations outcome and survival (Tables 2 and 3). Above-knee amputation was associated with an extremely high operative mortality of 19.2%, and 8.8% of amputees learnt to use a prosthesis. Community ambulation was resumed in only 15.4%, and 53.2% were institutionalised. Median survival was 8 months. Patients who underwent foot amputation had

One year after amputation, 55 CINPWT patients and 66 stump bandage patients had died (P =.82). Survival probabilities adjusted for age and gender 2 years after amputation were .52 (.43‐.61) and .49 (.42‐.58), respectively, and 3 years after amputation were .36 (.25‐.5 Subjects with an above-knee amputation had a 167 % increase in hazard (HR 2.67, 95 % CI 2.14-3.34), and below-knee amputation patients had a 67 % increase in hazard for death. CONCLUSIONS — Survival after amputation is lower in diabetic patients with CKD, dialysis, and high-level amputations 2) Long-Term Survival 1-year survival following BKA is 65% to 80% v/s 50% following AKA Diabetic patients' post amputations median time to death is 27.2 months versus 46.7 in non diabetics Dialysis patienyts had a 1-year survival of 51.9% v/s non-dialysisdependent patients had a 1-year survival rate of 75.4%. 48

Smoking cessation is associated with decreased mortality

above Knee Amputation - an overview ScienceDirect Topic

  1. Patient failed repeated thrombectomies and had a bilateral above-knee amputation. The patient was suspected to have acute on chronic emboli from the mechanical aortic valve and further testing did not elucidate contributory causes of her critical limb ischemia. Patients often achieved low mortality within 30 years of operation with survival.
  2. amputation: Definition Amputation is the intentional surgical removal of a limb or body part. It is performed to remove diseased tissue or relieve pain . Purpose Arms, legs, hands, feet, fingers, and toes can be amputated. Most amputations involve small body parts such as a finger, rather than an entire limb. About 65,000 amputations are.
  3. The entire study population had a 2‐year mortality rate of around 50% and a 3‐year mortality rate of 60% to 65%. Our mortality rates after major non‐traumatic lower‐extremity amputation are comparable with the rest of Denmark as we present mortality rates of the better end of earlier published data. 9-1
  4. If your dog is 8, and the average lifespan for his weight and breed is 10 years, and your veterinarian tells you that his survival time for his cancer is about 18 months to two years, and calls that a long time, he's right from a medical perspective. From a medical perspective, having a dog live the average lifespan is a good result
  5. g the mast cell is in a place where it can be completely removed through surgery (including a wide margin to account for cancer cells not seen) *there is a 90 - 100% chance the tumor will not recur
  6. Amputation Definition Amputation is the intentional surgical removal of a limb or body part. It is performed to remove diseased tissue or relieve pain. Purpose Arms, legs, hands, feet, fingers, and toes can be amputated. Most amputations involve small body parts such as a finger, rather than an entire limb. About 65,000 amputations are performed in the.

accounts for 16 per cent of annual amputations, whereas traumatic amputees represent 45 per cent of people living with an amputation. In the military setting, amputation rates have doubled as a result of the improved survival afforded by advances in both body armour and military medicine. Severe limb trauma is now the signature combat injury. Nearly half of the individuals who have an amputation due to vascular disease will die within 5 years. This is higher than the five year mortality rates for breast cancer, colon cancer, and prostate cancer . Of persons with diabetes who have a lower extremity amputation, up to 55% will require amputation of the second leg within 2‐3 year Survival probabilities for below- and above-knee amputees were 77% and 59% at 1 year, 57% and 39% at 3 years, and 28% and 20% at 7.5 years. The lowest quartile of survival risk had a 61% five-year survival compared with 14% for the highest-risk quartile

An aggressive policy of bilateral saphenous vein harvest

OBJECTIVE To evaluate the early and late major amputation and survival rates and related risk factors in diabetic patients with critical limb ischemia (CLI). DESIGN Retrospective study. METHODS Revascularization feasibility, major amputation, survival rate and related risk factors were recorded in 564 diabetic patients consecutively hospitalized for CLI from 1999 to 2003 and followed until. The lower cost associated with major amputation was attributed to lower survival rates. When adjusting for follow‐up duration, cost per patient‐year was $49 700 for endovascular revascularization, $49 200 for surgical revascularization, and $55 700 for major amputation (P<0.001 comparing each revascularization approach to major amputation)

Mortality after amputation in dialysis patients is high

Methods: Revascularization feasibility, major amputation, survival rate and related risk factors were recorded in 564 diabetic patients consecutively hospitalized for CLI from 1999 to 2003 and followed until June 2005. Results: Peripheral angioplasty (PTA) was carried out in 420 (74.5%), bypass graft (BPG) in 117 (20.7%) patients. In 27 (4.8%. Hip amputations, like Hood's, had mortality rates of around 83%. The closer to the body the amputation was done, the more the increase in the wound being mortal. An upper arm amputation, as was done on Stonewall Jackson or General Oliver O. Howard (who lost his arm at Fair Oaks in 1862) had a mortality rate of about 24% Patients who do not die of sepsis or organ failure frequently undergo amputation of an involved limb. Currently, the 1- and 5-year survival rates are estimated to be 45% and 35%, respectively.. The main sites of amputation are; Just below the knee. Through the knee. Through the thigh. The site of amputation will depend on how poor the blood supply to your leg is. If possible, below knee amputations are performed, as it is easier to walk with an artificial limb after the operation. However, many people do well after a thigh amputation

Factors affecting lifespan following below-knee amputation

Generally, mortality rates dropped as the distance from the trunk of the body increased. For example, amputations at the wrist joint had a 10.4 percent death rate, while amputations at the shoulder joint had a 29.1 percent death rate. Take a closer look at amputation through the lens of a single story in this vide Revascularization feasibility, major amputation, survival rate and related risk factors were recorded in 564 diabetic patients consecutively hospitalized for CLI from 1999 to 2003 and followed until June 2005. Results. Peripheral angioplasty (PTA) was carried out in 420 (74.5%), bypass graft (BPG) in 117 (20.7%) patients. In 27 (4.8%) patients.

Physical Therapy Guide to Above-Knee Amputation

  1. Revascularization feasibility, major amputation, survival rate and related risk factors were recorded in 564 diabetic patients consecutively hospitalized for CLI from 1999 to 2003 and followed until June 2005. RESULTS. Peripheral angioplasty (PTA) was carried out in 420 (74.5%), bypass graft (BPG) in 117 (20.7%) patients. In 27 (4.8%) patients.
  2. and diabetes. Survival figures showed that 25.5% of amputees died within 2 months of amputation, 60.7% were alive after one year and 43.2% after two years. Out of a total of 577 patients, 26.9% were fitted with a prosthesis. Out of below-knee and above-knee amputees surviving over 2 months, 61.5% and 27.2
  3. survival of included patients, as a rule. The reported survival rate ranges from 59 to 92 percent 6 months after amputation [13-15,17-20] and from 59 to 67 percent 12 months after amputation [15-16,18-20]. Only one study provided a 2-year follow-up [14]: the survival rate was 59 percent
  4. Chief outcome measures: Mortality, amputation, rehabilitation, survival and knee salvage rates. The Kaplan-Meier method was used for comparison of factors associated with knee preservation. Results- Primary amputees had a higher in-hospital mortality (18% vs. 10%) but similar 3 year survival rates (30%
  5. High risk of death after major diabetes-related amputations. (HealthDay)—There is a high risk of postoperative mortality among patients undergoing lower-limb amputation, according to a study.
  6. 100%, and complications are 12-92%. Moreover, for Amputation, survival is 84-100%, and the complication rate ranges from 12-70%.5 Due to advancements in Limb sparing techniques, surgeries have been possible without influencing the tibial OSA patients' survival rate.6 Although various studies have different finding
  7. But amputation might not be the only solution for Bill. People with advanced stages of PAD are at risk for amputation but do have treatment options - such as endovascular procedures. 12 Plus, saving toes, feet and legs in PAD patients has been shown to improve survival rates. 17. For Bill, that could mean getting his life back

Above-the-Knee Leg Amputation: What to Expect at Hom

  1. Long-term survival and cure rates have increased to between 60 and 80 percent in patients with localized disease. Before 1970, osteosarcomas were treated with amputation. Survival was poor: 80.
  2. Amputation is an acquired condition that results in the loss of a limb, usually from injury, disease, or surgery. Congenital (present at birth) limb deficiency occurs when an infant is born without part or all of a limb. In the U.S., 82% of amputations are due to vascular disease. Nearly 70% of amputations due to trauma involve the upper limbs
  3. In the amputation arm of the LEAP study, 30% of patients were rehospitalized because of complications within the first 2 years and 14.5% required stump revision 24. Similarly, a retrospective analysis of upper-extremity amputations in a military population showed a 42% rate of revision surgery after a median duration of follow-up of 20 months.

leg amputation gangrene diabetes life expectancy

Lower extremity amputation is performed to remove ischemic, infected, or necrotic tissue or locally unresectable tumor and may be life-saving. The majority of lower extremity amputations are performed for lower extremity ischemia (peripheral artery disease, embolism) and diabetes mellitus. Extremity trauma is the second leading cause for. From historical cohort studies the patient survival rate after a lower-limb amputation because of vascular problems is clearly moderate to low over time [1-12]. However, prospective studies on lower-limb amputees seldom report their survival rates, inclusion and exclusion criteria, and/or referral and dropout rates (death included) [13-20] Of the 28 incomplete nonviable amputations, all sur- vived, while 14 of the 19 complete amputations sur- vived (success rate, 74 percent) (Figure 1). Overall, from 47 patients who underwent replantationhevas- cularization procedures, 42 were succesful with an average survival rate of 89 percent. Of the .5 unsuc morbidities and survival after amputation is thus often short (Lepa¨ntalo and Ma¨tzke 1996; Feinglass et al. 2000). Despite the considerable number of studies on critical limb ischaemia and amputations, there are only few concentrating on gender differences and those which do exclude amputations due to trauma or tumour Remove the diseased tissue and any crushed bone. Smooth uneven areas of bone. Seal off blood vessels and nerves. Cut and shape muscles so that the stump, or end of the limb, will be able to have.

Postoperative Death After Lower-Limb Amputation in a

  1. Dogs between 7 and 10 years old have a higher survival rate than dogs who are smaller and older. In the case of axial osteosarcoma, The median survival rate is 4-5 months, because the disease Reoccurgerea and full surgical intervention are not possible due to its location. Amputation will result in total removal of the Disease. The proximal.
  2. [11,12] Previous reports have estimated that the 1-year post-LEA mortality rate in people with diabetes is between 10 and 50%, and the 5-year mortality rate post-LEA is between 30 and 80%
  3. Elderly father, age 80 facing amputation. My father -age 80- is now facing the fact that he will probably have to have his left leg amputated. He had a stroke in January and of course the left leg was damaged. Time has passed and the leg is getting worse. The vascular surgeon says to remap the veins would take 6 hours and he will not live.
  4. The operative mortality rates were significant: 5% for reconstruction or sympathectomy and 15% for major amputation. Survival probabilities were 80% at 1 year, 50% at 5 years, and 35% at 10 years. The 2-year survival rates correlated with the surgical procedure: 70% for arterial reconstruction, 60% for sympathectomy, and 55% for major amputation
  5. Ideal length of amputation stump Above knee amputation : 23-27 cm from greater trochanter or 12 cm from knee Below knee amputation : 12 -17 cm stump length 2.5cm for every 30 cm of height Above elbow amputation : 20 cm from shoulder Below elbow amputation : 18 cm from olecranon 15

Amputation in elderly and high-risk vascular patients

Rates of UE prosthetic use range from 27% 12 to 56%. 13 Within the UE amputee population, those fit with a prosthesis within 30 days of amputation exhibited a 93% rehabilitation success rate with a 100% return to work rate within 4 months of injury. Those fit beyond 30 days had a 42% success rate with a 15% return to work rate in 6-24 months. 1 Above-Knee Amputations. As much thigh length as possible was kept at the time of initial amputation in order to provide a biomechanically functional remnant and to obtain a closed stump. All methods described for the treatment of the below-knee amputee were applicable, in some form, to above-knee amputations Limb-sparing surgery is a gold standard of surgical treatment, and long-term survival rates are favorable in that group of patients comparing to a group of patients after amputation. Majority of patients treated with resection and megaprosthetic reconstruction allowed them to return to normal life and work

Mortality and Hospitalization in Patients After Amputation

  1. Lower-extremity amputation is one of the oldest known surgically performed procedures, dating back to prehistoric times. [1, 2] Neolithic humans are known to have survived traumatic, ritualistic, and punitive rather than therapeutic amputations.Cave-wall hand imprints have been found that demonstrate the loss of digits
  2. d that the rate of successful gait for a person with vascular disease and bilateral above knee amputations is extremely low. Also, energy expenditure in a patient with bilateral above knee amputations increases almost threefold, and double that of a bilateral below knee amputee, resulting in increased demand on the cardiac system.
  3. People with diabetes are prone to foot disease, which can lead to amputations and even death. Australia has the second-highest rate of lower-limb amputations in the developed world - with the.