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Latissimus dorsi flap blood supply

The thoracodorsal artery is the primary source of blood supply to the latissimus dorsi flap. At the time of breast reconstruction, the muscle flap, with or without attached skin, is elevated off of the back and brought around to the front of the chest wall. The main vessels remain attached to the body to ensure proper blood supply to the flap Blood supply. The latissimus dorsi muscle is supplied by 2 separate vascular systems. The dominant blood supply arises from the thoracodorsal artery, which is the terminal branch of the subscapular artery. It also has a secondary blood supply, which arises from segmental perforating branches off of the intercostal and lumbar arteries In a latissimus dorsi flap procedure, an oval flap of skin, fat, muscle, and blood vessels from your upper back is used to reconstruct the breast. This flap is moved under your skin around to your chest to rebuild your breast. The blood vessels (artery and vein) of the flap are left attached to their original blood supply in your back Latissimus Dorsi: Innervation & Blood Supply The latissimus dorsi muscle is innervated, or supplied with nerves and nerve impulses, by the thoracodorsal nerve. The thoracodorsal nerve is a nerve.. The latissimus is a component of the subscapular system of flaps. Blood supply is derived from the thoracodorsal artery that is a distal continuation of the subscapular artery following the branching of the circumflex scapular. Occasionally, the circumflex scapular and thoracodorsal will both branch directly off the axillary artery

Blood Supply Thoracodorsal artery is the primary blood supply of the Latissimus Dorsi muscle. Additional small arteries come from dorsal branches of posterior intercostal and lumbar arteries. Origin and Insertion of Latissimus Dorsi During a latissimus dorsi flap breast reconstruction, an oval section of fat, muscle, and a small amount of skin is tunneled from your upper back to the mastectomy area to rebuild your chest. The blood vessels of the flap are left attached to their original blood supply in your back

Latissimus Dorsi Flap - Breast Reconstruction

Back (latissimus dorsi flap). This surgical technique takes skin, fat and muscle from your upper back, tunneling it under your skin to your chest. Because the amount of skin and other tissue is generally less than in a TRAM flap surgery, this approach may be used for small and medium-sized breasts or for creating a pocket for a breast implant During latissimus dorsi flap reconstruction surgery, an incision is made in your back near your shoulder blade. Then, an oval section of skin, fat, blood vessels, and muscle is slid through a tunnel under the skin under your arm to your chest and formed into a breast shape. The blood vessels are left attached to their original blood supply in.

latissimus dorsi flap viability when elevated on this branch. Studies during microvascular transfer document reversal of flow in the serratus branch to supply the latissimus dorsi muscle after division of the thoracodorsal artery. Latissimus dorsi flap elevation as an island may be reliably based on th Blood supply The thoracodorsal artery (a continuation of the subscapular artery), supplies the latissimus dorsi muscle. It enters the muscle on its costal surface, medial to the lateral border and a few centimetres from the subscapular artery In breast reconstruction with the latissimus dorsi, a muscle located on the back along with its attached skin (and some intervening fat) is transferred to the chest region for the breast reconstruction procedure. The muscle flap maintains its own blood supply, and helps nourish the tissue that is transferred to the chest wall region

The blood supply to the latissimus dorsi arises from one dominant pedicle and is supported by many segmental vessels (type V pattern of circulation) Latissimus dorsi (LD) flaps are widely used in breast reconstruction for their ease of use and minimal sacrifice of the donor site. Various strategies to increase flap volume have been suggested, but tissue volume is often insufficient for patients with little subcutaneous fat The latissimus muscle flap is a workhorse flap for salvage of failed expander-implant reconstructions. The flap also provides trophic stimulation to the surrounding tissues without increased.. Since our standard flap for lower extremity reconstruction is a latissimus dorsi flap, we became interested in transferring a portion of the lateral border of the scapula along with the latissimus muscle. We dissected 34 cadaver scapulas in order to verify the reliability of the blood supply to the lateral border of the scapula based on the. Arterial Supply of the Flap (Figs 41.1, 41.2 and Figs 11.1 and 11.5) The latissimus dorsi muscle has a dual blood supply from the subscapular artery and the posterior paraspinous perforators. Both circulatory systems are diffusely interconnected so that the muscle can survive in its entirety if either pedicle is interrupted

The lateral edge of the skin paddle should not be designed beyond anterior edge of the latissimus dorsi. The flap can be harvested to a length of 21-38 cm and a width of 7-14 cm. As the skin receives it blood supply from the latissimus dorsi, several skin paddles can be prepared Blood Supply of Latissimus dorsi The arterial blood supply is from the Thoracodorsal artery, which is a branch of the subscapular artery; there are additional small arterial branches from dorsal branches of posterior intercostal and lumbar arteries

Latissimus Myocutaneous Flap: Overview, Anatomy

Latissimus Dorsi Flap Reconstruction . This form of breast reconstruction involves harvesting the latissimus dorsi muscle and overlying skin paddle from the upper back, while leaving its native blood supply in tact. The flap is then tunneled around to the chest, creating a natural-looking breast mound. Once the breast mound has been created, an. With the Latissimus flap breast reconstruction procedure, Dr. Gupta uses the latissimus muscle from the upper back, and the overlying skin and fat, to reconstruct the breast. The tissue from the back is left attached to its blood and nerve supply in the armpit, and is tunneled through the armpit from the back to the chest The latissimus dorsi flap, first performed by Tansini in 1892, was popularised for use by Olivari in 1976. The successful transfer of a latissimus dorsi flap during breast reconstruction has previously been thought to be dependent on having an intact thoracodorsal pedicle to ensure flap survival

Latissimus Dorsi Flap - Breastcancer

  1. INTRODUCTION: The latissimus dorsi muscle flap is a type V according to Mathes and Nahai. It is vascularized by a proximal main pedicle represented by the thoraco-dorsal pedicle and pedicle distal accessory represented by the dorsal branches of the posterior intercostal arteries
  2. ant thoracodorsal pedicle as well as free tissue transfer. The distally based or reverse fashion design has been used to repair myelomeningoceles, congenital diaphragmatic agenesis, or thoracolumbar defects
  3. The flap may also be used in combination with the latissimus dorsi flap based on the common thoracodorsal vascular pedicle, a blood supply which has hitherto been proven to be reliable. This case demonstrates a totally independent arterial supply to the serratus anterior and latissimus dorsi muscles

Latissimus Dorsi: Origin, Innervation & Blood Supply

  1. Partial or total flap loss (1-2%) - the latissimus dorsi muscle that is transferred from the back to the front stays alive via its blood supply high in the armpit. The blood supply can be interrupted via previous axillary dissection or during the process of transfer in which case part or all of the flap may not survive
  2. Latissimus flap reconstruction is a simpler procedure compared to other flap procedures because it does not require microsurgery. The tissue is kept on its original blood supply and is rotated to a new area, rather than detached from its blood supply and reattached, which requires microscopic surgery
  3. Latissimus Dorsi Flap. The latissimus dorsi (LD) muscle originates from the six caudal thoracic spines and fascia, the lumbar spines and fascia, and the posterior iliac crest. It inserts into the humerus. Its blood supply is from the thoracodorsal artery, accompanied by the thora-codorsal vein and nerve. The neurovascular pedicle enters the.
  4. Blood supply to latissimus dorsi muscle The thoracodorsal artery provides the main blood supply to the latissimus dorsi. The thoracodorsal artery and vein course supe-riorly along the thoracic wall on the deep surface of the latissimus dorsi towards the axilla. The artery is 1.5 - 4mm in diameter and the vein is usually 2.5 - 4.5mm in dia-meter
  5. In fact, latissimus dorsi flap surgery usually includes inserting an implant under the flap (the tissue moved from the back). The tissue moved from the back can remain attached to its original site, with the blood vessels uncut, so the tissue retains its own blood supply. Or, the tissue can be completely removed and transplanted to the chest

During reconstruction the flap, with or without attached skin, is elevated off the back and brought to the front of the chest wall. The thoracodorsal artery is the primary source of blood supply to the latissimus dorsi flap and the main vessels remain attached to the body to ensure proper blood supply to the new breasts The blood supply to the latissimus dorsi arises from one dominant pedicle and is supported by many segmental vessels (type V pattern of circulation). The thoracodorsal artery branches from the subscapular artery just distal to the circumflex scapular artery and enters the muscle in the posterior axilla 10-11 cm inferior to the origin of its. A flap of dimensions 15 X 8 cm can be harvested on a single perforator. These dimensions allow for both primary closure of the donor site and avoidance of post-operative venous congestion in the flap. Anatomy. After originating from the subscapular axis, the thoracodorsal vessels course toward the latissimus dorsi The free microsurgical transfer of the latissimus dorsi flap can be used in reconstruction of extensive upper extremity defects. 3. It can be used in reconstruction of contaminated wounds and osteomyelitis. Can be useful in augmenting blood supply to areas of deficiency, for example, in postradiation tissue necrosis, diabetes mellitus, and. The design and the vascular supply of the musculocutaneous latissimus dorsi flap (MLD musculus latissimus dorsi, TDA&V thoracodorsal artery & vein). Full size imag

Latissimus Free Flap and Pedicled Flap Iowa Head and

  1. latissimus dorsi blood supply. thoracodorsal artery. latissimus flap transfer. thoracodorsal artery is the primary source of blood supply to the latissimus dorsi flap at the time of breast reconstruction, the muscle flap, with or without attached skin, is elevated off of the back and brought around to the front of the chest wall.
  2. A latissimus dorsi flap reconstruction does have some advantages, such as being close to the donor site as well as the blood vessels it requires. Perhaps, the ideal candidate for this surgery is a.
  3. ocedure is advantageous from the standpoint of a low rate of flap ischemia, thrombosis, and total flap loss, these complications are still occasionally observed due to intraoperative pedicle injury, postoperative torsion, or compression. Here we report on a case of severe venous thrombosis in a pedicled latissimus dorsi (LD) flap used for breast reconstruction. The patient was a 52-year-old.
  4. Latissimus Dorsi. LD muscle is a large fan like muscle starting behind the armpit and spreading on the back. This flap uses the muscle along with an oval/ elliptical island of skin and underlying fat, which is then rotated via the armpit into the breast defect to rebuild the breast. The blood vessels are moved along with the muscle, so the flap.
  5. The blood supply to the latissimus dorsi muscle after vascular delay and electrical prestimulation is only based on one pedicle, the thoracodorsal artery. The Vineberg procedure provides, with the IMA, a second source of arterial blood supply to the latissimus dorsi muscle. We did not measure the blood flow in this stud
  6. Because of the muscle's proximity to the chest, latissimus dorsi flap for breast reconstruction after mastectomy is a popular technique. In addition, the transferred tissue can remain attached to its natural blood supply, making the procedure less complicated than other flap procedures. The latissimus dorsi flap can be used for breast.
  7. In a latissimus flap reconstruction, Mr Paul Tulley removes an oval skin flap, along with muscle, fat and blood vessels from the upper back. It's quite an extensive procedure and the blood vessels are kept fully attached to the same blood supply from the back. To do this, an incision will be created close to the shoulder blade on your back

1. Anatomy . The main blood supply to the latissimus dorsi (LD) muscle is supplied by the thoracodorsal (TD) pedicle. After giving the serratus anterior (SA) branch, the TD vessels divide into two branches, the descending or vertical branch and the horizontal branch (figure 1) Blood Supply Blood Supply of Upper Ext. Medbullets Onboarding - Draft HTML Forearm blood supply Anatomy⎪Latissimus Dorsi Anatomy - Latissimus Dorsi; Listen Now 3:5 min. 1/4/2021. 11 plays. 0.0 (0) EXPERT COMMENTS (2. Thoracodorsal Artery Perforator (TDAP or TAP) flap from the back (this is the perforator version of a latissimus dorsi flap). Fat (no muscle) is rotated under the skin from the back to the chest and remains connected to its original blood supply Latissimus dorsi flap breast reconstruction uses skin, tissue and blood vessels from the upper back to recreate the breast mound after cancerous breast tissue has been removed with a mastectomy. Although mastectomy is a life-saving procedure, the loss of a breast often leaves the patient feeling incomplete and insecure

Latissimus Dorsi - Innervation, Blood Supply and Functions

During latissimus dorsi flap reconstruction surgery, an incision is made in your back near your shoulder blade. Then, an oval section of skin, fat, blood vessels, and muscle is slid through a tunnel under the skin under your arm to your chest and formed into a breast shape. The blood vessels are left attached to their original blood supply in. In addition to the thoracodorsal artery, the latissimus dorsi also receives blood supply from dorsal perforating branches of the lower three posterior intercostal arteries and the upper three lumbar arteries. The lymphatic drainage of this muscle follows the typical pattern of lymphatic drainage with superficial and deep lymphatics which will.

Pink Awareness: Surviving the Carnage

Latissimus Dorsi Flap: Uses, Side Effects, Procedure, Result

With pedicle flaps (e.g. pedicled latissimus dorsi flap or pedicled TRAM flap) the purpose of range of motion limitations is to avoid a stretch on the flap that may disrupt the blood supply. Complications, particularly those related to blood supply, usually occur within the first few days following surgery Blood Supply of Latissimus dorsi. The arterial blood supply is from the Thoracodorsal artery, which is a branch of the subscapular artery; there are additional small arterial branches from dorsal branches of posterior intercostal and lumbar arteries. The venous drainage is from the thoracodorsal vein, which drains the apical part of Latissimus. The use of the latissimus dorsi musculocutaneous flap for immediate correction of the deformity resulting from breast conservation surgery. Br J Plast Surg . 1999 Mar. 52(2):99-103. [Medline] The latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flap or myofascial flap is a useful technique with many head, neck, and torso reconstruction applications. [1] [2] It can be harvested in a pedicled fashion or for free tissue transfer, and it can provide a large amount of pliable soft-tissue often not available with other types of flaps

Breast reconstruction with flap surgery - Mayo Clini

A Latissimus Dorsi (LD) Flap may be combined. with an implant to increase the volume and. the flap to ensure it has a good blood supply. You will have two to three drains inserted. during the surgery and these will be removed. once fluid has adequately stopped draining an abdominal free flap used in breast recon where the superior inferior epigastric artery and vein are isolated and used to reconnect to new blood supply in the chest wall latissimus dorsi flap the section of skin, fat, and muscle overlaying the lower scapular regio using a flap from your back (latissimus dorsi flap) As with the free TRAM flap, the blood supply can become completely blocked off with clots. Some women may need to go back to the operating theatre within a few days to improve the blood supply. If the blood supply is cut off, the flap tissue dies and the reconstruction will fail, but this.

Latissimus dorsi flap reconstruction utilizes skin and muscle from the back which is tunneled just under the skin to the reconstructed breast. The flap stays connected to its donor site, leaving blood supply intact. Because the back has less fatty tissue than the abdomen, an implant is generally necessary to achieve the desired breast size. A flap always has a blood supply. So that's our plan today is we're going to take a flap from the back based on the latissimus dorsi muscle. This is probably the number one most commonly used muscles for flap of the body

Latissimus Dorsi Flap Reconstruction: What to Expec

  1. A latissimus dorsi-serratus anterior chimeric flap was available to fill the empyema cavity, and we further added vascular anastomosis to control the fungal infection and provide richer blood supply. Indocyanine green injection was also used to evaluate the flap blood flow . In conclusion, extended latissimus dorsi thoraco-myoplasty with a.
  2. The skin island based on the reverse latissimus dorsi muscle can be as large as 8 X 20 cm. This is confirmed by anatomic dissections and clinical cases. Knowledge of the blood supply facilitates elevation of the flap and extends its utility
  3. The latissimus dorsi flap is a breast reconstruction surgery based on the latissimus dorsi muscle that is located on your back. The latissimus dorsi muscle with the overlying skin from the back is used to rebuild the breast mound and provides the supportive tissue, innervation and blood supply for a natural-appearing breast
  4. ed to have sufficient reach to cover the resultant large anterior chest wall defect
  5. FYI<br />The thoracodorsal artery is the primary source of blood supply to the latissimus dorsi flap.<br />The muscle flap, with or without attached skin, is elevated off of the back and brought around to the front of the chest wall. <br />The main vessels remain attached to the body to ensure proper blood supply to the flap

Latissimus dorsi blood supply after thoracodorsal vessel

The blood vessels are then reattached to the corresponding vessels in the breast via microsurgery, as well as the skin and fat. Other techniques include a TRAM flap, which also uses muscles from the abdomen, and a Latissimus Dorsi flap, involving a tissue transfer from the upper back muscle. Dr

Latissimus dorsi: Origin, insertion, innervation,function

Perforator flap surgery is a technique used in reconstructive surgery where skin and/or subcutaneous fat are removed from a distant or adjacent part of the body to reconstruct the excised part. The vessels that supply blood to the flap are isolated perforator(s) derived from a deep vascular system through the underlying muscle or intermuscular septa Iliac Artery Perforator) flap Jp Hong Lecture series - Using perforator as a recipient source in lower extremity reconstruction Medial Sural Artery Page 5/42. Rotation flap Anatomy Of The Latissimus Dorsi Muscle - Everything You Need To Know - Dr. Nabil Ebraheim Radial forearm flap harvest Scapholunate ligament tea In breast reconstruction with the latissimus dorsi, a muscle located on the back along with its attached skin is transferred to the chest region for the breast reconstruction procedure. The muscle flap maintains its own blood supply, and helps nourish the tissue that is transferred to the chest wall region. There ar The flap is then moved from the back to the breast pocket by tunneling it underneath the intervening skin, leaving its blood supply completely intact. Recovery after the Latissimus Dorsi Flap. Following surgery, the patient is admitted to hospital for 2 days. Drainage tubes will be inserted in the back and breast and will be removed by Dr. Yau. Abstract A case is reported in which perfusion of a latissimus dorsi musculocutaneous flap was maintained through its secondary blood supply during transfer to a sacral defect, while its thoracodorsal pedicle was being lengthened by saphenous vein grafts. The secondary blood supply was divided only when the microvascular anastomoses were seen to be functioning so this flap was never a truly.

Latissimus Dorsi Flap - Oncology - Mitch Medical Healthcare

What is Latissimus flap reconstruction? In breast reconstruction with the latissimus dorsi, a muscle located on the back along with its attached skin is transferred to the chest region for the breast reconstruction procedure. The muscle flap maintains its own blood supply, and helps nourish the tissue that is transferred to the chest wall region Latissimus Dorsi Flap Procedure. In this procedure, Dr. Paul Pin will take an oval-shaped flap of skin, tissue, and muscle from the latissimus dorsi and pull it toward the front of the body to serve as the material for reconstructing the breast. The flap remains attached to its original blood supply in the back, so there is little to no need.

Breast Surgery | Breast Reconstruction | Breast Implants

with adequate blood supply avoiding local flap necrosis after relocation. The trapezius muscle compared with other muscles for the coverage of the posterior defect such as latissimus dorsi, has a low donor site morbidity and allows early rehabilitation. Glenohumeral function is preserved in lowe To evaluate the feasibility of implanting the internal mammary artery (IMA) in the latissimus dorsi muscle (LDM) during cardiomyoplasty to create a bipediculated muscle flap. Four dogs went under cardiomyoplasty with the right LDM. The IMA was dissected with the intercostal arteries branching from the IMA clipped except for the three most distal branches When the latissimus Doris muscle is used it stays attached to the nerve and blood supply. We can use all or part of the muscle whatever is required to achieve the best results. The remaining unused muscle may atrophy (shrink), and looses some strength but still functions. Each LD can only be used one time

This flap is moved under your skin around to your chest to rebuild your breast. The blood vessels (artery and vein) of the flap are left attached to their original blood supply in your back. Because the flap contains a significant amount of muscle, a latissimus dorsi flap is considered a muscle-transfer Latissimus Dorsi The latissimus dorsi flap is the most commonly used flap for thoracic defects. Its predominant blood supply is from the thoracodorsal artery (Fig 3). It can be used as a turnover flap or placed directly into the wound. It is particularly useful for bronchopleural fistulas originating from a lower lobe bronchus Breast reconstruction using the Latissimus dorsi flap provides another option for women seeking reconstruction following mastectomy. This flap utilizes skin and muscle from the back and is most often combined with breast implants to create a breast mound and replace the skin missing from the mastectomy surgery. the excellent blood supply. If you pursue latissimus dorsi flap reconstruction, skin and muscle tissue from your the flank area of your back will be moved to the breast reconstruction site, and the nerve and blood supply will be tunneled under your skin to support the transferred tissues at their new location on the chest wall

Previous study has suggested that latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flap grafting accompanied with T-shaped arterial pedicle can restore the continuity of the blood supply arteries in the donor site and decrease the risk of disorders of the affected limbs. Usage of T-shaped blood vessels can perform vascular graft bridging, resolve the vascular. Experience with 51 latissimus dorsal flaps is described. Used either as a muscular flap, a myocutaneous flap, or an island flap, it has an excellent blood supply and is suitable for the repair of large defects of the chest wall The free latissimus dorsi (LD) myocutaneous flap is one of the most reliable flaps used in microsurgical reconstruction with the length and caliber of its vascular pedicle (the thoracodorsal artery), in addition to its relatively constant anatomy, making the microsurgical vascular anastomosis technically more feasible . Moreover, the LD flap.

Modern Perforator Flap Imaging with High-Resolution BloodLatissimus dorsi flap for reconstruction in head and neckCHEST WALL RECONSTRUCTION - Plastic surgeryThe Pectoralis Major Myocutaneous Flap | Pocket Dentistry

The latissimus dorsi (LD) muscle has been previously described to repair diaphragmatic defects, but as a reverse flap, relying on secondary blood supply from the perforating lumbar vessels rather than primary inflow from the dominant thoracodorsal artery The latissimus dorsi is a prime example of such a flap since it can remain attached to its primary blood source which preserves the skins functioning, and is associated with better outcomes in comparison to other muscle and skin donor sites Abstract Background: Dynamic cardiomyoplasty has shown promise as a surgical treatment for congestive heart failure, however, skeletal muscle damage has been reported in the latissimus dorsi muscle flap. Possible etiologies for the muscle damage include surgical dissection of the latissimus dorsi muscle with interruption of collateral blood supply, as well as chronic electrical stimulation of. 11 Halim A S, Wan Z. Anomalous arterial supply to the muscles in a combined latissimus dorsi and serratus anterior flap. Clin Anat. 2004; 17 358-35 Another 5. Ding SY (1993) Treatment of chronic osteomyelitis of the leg disadvantage is that additional blood supply to the leg is with free latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flap anastomosed to not provided. However, it has been reported that a cross- contralateral leg vessels